Vintage Ads

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REO Motor Car Co., 1930 on Flickr.


Scanned from Taschen’s "All-American Ads of the 30s".
Click image for 673 x 875 size.
“This Young Couple is about to make an important decision… and it probably will be wrong
This young man and his wife are about to make one of their most exciting dreams come true - they are about to buy an automobile.
They want a Reo, and want it badly. But every time they look longingly at it, Old Man Budget wags a warning finger. And Old Man Budget probably will wheedle them into buying a cheap car, on the pretext that it is the only car they can afford.
If they do buy a cheap car, here’s what probably will happen. For a few months, it will be quite thrilling. True, there will be petty annoyances and petty expenses. True, every time they mention the name of the car they own, it will be accompanied by something that sounds suspiciously like an apology.
But at the end of a year, or maybe two, that thrill is completely missing - their car is definetely on the downward trail. So they trade it in - and take a staggering loss in depreciation. Their cheap car has cost them dearly.
BUT - suppose this young couple makes the right decision - suppose they do buy a Reo Flying Cloud. Let’s see what will happen then!
At the end of a year - yes, and at the end of three, four, or five years, their Reo Flying Cloud will still be running sweeter than the cheaper car would have at any time. The Reo is good - really good - for 100,000 miles. Why?
Why does the Reo outlive all cars of American make and origin, regardless of price? Let’s find out - let’s see what’s under the paint.
Reo pays 10% to 25% more for parts, so that these parts will stand a strain 50% to 100% greater than you ever will ask a car to take. Reo axles and springs are so sturdy that Reo gives them a test that is the equivalent of shooting the car off a four-foot ledge at 60 miles an hour.
Performance? Reo climbs from a standing start to 60 miles an hour in 26 seconds. You may never want to go that fast. But think of the ease and safety of driving a car with such acceleration and flexibility. That’s one reason why Reo is known as the easiest car in the world to drive.
And Reo’s marvelous brakes will bring the car from 60 down to a dead stop in 4 seconds, with never a skid or swerve even on a shiny-wet road. Reo brakes cannot become unequalized. Watter cannot affect them. And they’ve been known to function on their original bands for 50,000 miles!
And looks? Reo lines give to the Reo Flying Cloud the kind of classic beauty usually found only in the higher priced cars - beauty that does not fade - beauty that does not demand the frequent, radical body changes that cause heavy depreciation.
Come, Budget, give these young people a break. Their Reo will be a really economical investment - not for just a year, but for 100,000 miles.
Budget - Let them have their Reo
Reo Flying Cloud
Good for 100,000 miles
Reo Motor Car Company, Lansing, Michigan”

REO Motor Car Co., 1930 on Flickr.


Scanned from Taschen’s "All-American Ads of the 30s".

Click image for 673 x 875 size.

“This Young Couple is about to make an important decision… and it probably will be wrong

This young man and his wife are about to make one of their most exciting dreams come true - they are about to buy an automobile.

They want a Reo, and want it badly. But every time they look longingly at it, Old Man Budget wags a warning finger. And Old Man Budget probably will wheedle them into buying a cheap car, on the pretext that it is the only car they can afford.

If they do buy a cheap car, here’s what probably will happen. For a few months, it will be quite thrilling. True, there will be petty annoyances and petty expenses. True, every time they mention the name of the car they own, it will be accompanied by something that sounds suspiciously like an apology.

But at the end of a year, or maybe two, that thrill is completely missing - their car is definetely on the downward trail. So they trade it in - and take a staggering loss in depreciation. Their cheap car has cost them dearly.

BUT - suppose this young couple makes the right decision - suppose they do buy a Reo Flying Cloud. Let’s see what will happen then!

At the end of a year - yes, and at the end of three, four, or five years, their Reo Flying Cloud will still be running sweeter than the cheaper car would have at any time. The Reo is good - really good - for 100,000 miles. Why?

Why does the Reo outlive all cars of American make and origin, regardless of price? Let’s find out - let’s see what’s under the paint.

Reo pays 10% to 25% more for parts, so that these parts will stand a strain 50% to 100% greater than you ever will ask a car to take. Reo axles and springs are so sturdy that Reo gives them a test that is the equivalent of shooting the car off a four-foot ledge at 60 miles an hour.

Performance? Reo climbs from a standing start to 60 miles an hour in 26 seconds. You may never want to go that fast. But think of the ease and safety of driving a car with such acceleration and flexibility. That’s one reason why Reo is known as the easiest car in the world to drive.

And Reo’s marvelous brakes will bring the car from 60 down to a dead stop in 4 seconds, with never a skid or swerve even on a shiny-wet road. Reo brakes cannot become unequalized. Watter cannot affect them. And they’ve been known to function on their original bands for 50,000 miles!

And looks? Reo lines give to the Reo Flying Cloud the kind of classic beauty usually found only in the higher priced cars - beauty that does not fade - beauty that does not demand the frequent, radical body changes that cause heavy depreciation.

Come, Budget, give these young people a break. Their Reo will be a really economical investment - not for just a year, but for 100,000 miles.

Budget - Let them have their Reo

Reo Flying Cloud
Good for 100,000 miles

Reo Motor Car Company, Lansing, Michigan”

Filed under 1930s transports american

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